3 New Studies to Change Our View of Environmental Employment

Angie - Test Knowles, | December-23-11
 
 
 
Three of the latest studies on environmental job trends
 

As yet another year draws to a close, we’ve been busy here at ECO Canada conducting new research to enhance our understanding of environmental employment. Each of these projects has been designed to produce findings that are not only interesting and relevant, but also deeply necessary for the creation of effective workforce development tools.
 
 
Here’s a snapshot of our three latest studies:
 
 

Developing Canada’s Green Economy

 
What is it about?
 
Few subjects in recent press have garnered as much attention as the green economy. To learn more about this hot topic and how it impacts Canadian employment, the researchers for Developing Canada’s Green Economy are constructing a definitional model to classify green industries, companies and jobs in Canada. This model will then be used in conjunction with a series of case-studies to identify and highlight emerging areas of opportunity.
 
How will it change our view of environmental employment?
 
Developing Canada’s Green Economy involves a redefinition of the scope of environmental work. Since the emergence of the green economy has produced a widespread adaptation and reallocation of existing jobs, green occupations are increasingly found outside of the traditionally-defined environmental sector. This project will identify how these emerging green jobs connect to our current approach of defining and measuring environmental employment.
 
Who will benefit the most from the study findings?
 
Developing Canada’s Green Economy will have special relevance for decision-makers who require consistent language and logic about the green economy to develop effective policies. By preparing an initial profile of green industries, occupations and skills, the study will also provide useful insights for employers and professionals involved in Canada’s green economy.
 
 

2011 Professional Engagement Study

 
What is it about?
 
The 2011 Professional Engagement Study has just been completed. Check out our summary of the report's highlights below:
 
 

 

This study featured a national benchmark to compare the engagement of environmental employees to workers in the general Canadian workforce, as well as strategic insights into the key drivers of environmental employee engagement.

 
How will it change our view of environmental employment?
 
The 2011 Professional Engagement Study offers a fresh perspective on what motivates environmental professionals. In contrast to previous research, this study is the first at ECO Canada to compare the engagement of workers in the environmental sector to those in the overall Canadian workforce. The results are remarkable. On the whole, environmental employees have higher rates of engagement than the average Canadian worker. However, this engagement can vary substantially according to such surprising factors as age, company size, and career path.
 
Who will benefit the most from the study findings?
 
Environmental employers stand to gain the most from this report’s detailed examination of employee engagement. Most of the study’s findings have been structured with the needs of employers in mind, including a list of recommended general and targeted strategies to increase worker engagement. 
 
 

HR Strategies for Environmental Employers

 
What is it about?
 
This project is a companion piece to the 2011 Professional Engagement Study. Whereas as the Professional research featured employees, this study focuses on employers to determine what employee skill-sets matter the most to them when they are planning to hire, retain and promote staff. Additionally, the study will compare and contrast employer and employee perceptions of different HR strategies.
 
How will it change our view of environmental employment?
 
This study presents a valuable “check” on assumptions about environmental skills requirements. Rather than simply infer which employee traits are the most valuable based on secondary sources, HR Strategies for Environmental Employers involves direct discussions with environmental companies across Canada. These insights will be critical to the later design of training programs that are well-informed and tailored to the HR needs of the environmental sector.
 
Who will benefit the most from the study findings?
 
The results from the HR Strategies for Environmental Employers project will be especially useful for environmental professionals and educators. In order to adapt to the sector’s transition to a more highly-skilled workforce, professionals need to know which skill areas matter the most to employers. In a similar vein, environmental educators can use the study’s targeted information on skills requirements to provide appropriate educational and training services.
 
 

When it comes to environmental employment, what topics would you be interested in seeing more research about in the new year?